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The Philosophy of Aristotle, in 10 Quotes

The roots of many modern disciplines can be traced back more than 2,000 years to the profound contributions of Aristotle, a brilliant thinker whose impact on human knowledge in science, politics, philosophy, and more remains indelible.

Aristotle was born in northern Greece in 384 BCE to parents who came from traditional medical backgrounds and who encouraged his intellectual pursuits. At roughly age 17, the future philosopher embarked on a 20-year career as a student of — and eventually a teacher alongside — Plato, in the vibrant learning center of Athens.

His mentorship under Plato shaped his philosophical foundation, but Aristotle's intellectual pursuits extended far beyond philosophy. He evolved into a polymath, branching out into a wide spectrum of disciplines, including science, politics, the arts, and even metaphysics. After leaving Athens for a number of years (during which time he married his wife Pythias), Aristotle was summoned to Macedonia in 342 BCE by King Philip II, who requested his expertise in educating his son — the future Alexander the Great.

In 335 BCE, Aristotle opened his own school in the Lyceum. His singular approach to knowledge, characterized by his insatiable curiosity and an unwavering commitment to understanding the underlying principles of the world, were dispersed throughout his approximately 200 works, of which only 31 survive.

Aristotle wasn’t content with merely absorbing information; rather, he analyzed and sought to unravel the “why” behind everything. This led to one of his most notable roles, as a pioneer of the scientific method. He championed empirical observations and endeavored to make sense of the world based on tangible evidence. His contributions to this field fundamentally influenced the scientific methods we still use to this day.

Beyond his scientific endeavors, Aristotle also displayed a keen interest in politics, ethics, and the complexities of society. The Greek great’s intellectual curiosity and desire to explore, explain, and enhance the world have left a lasting legacy, and his body of work serves as a timeless source of wisdom and insight. Here are some of Aristotle's most poignant quotes that exemplify the way he saw the world.

In all things of nature there is something of the marvelous.

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Aristotle had a sincere appreciation for and curiosity about the world around him, and he spent a significant amount of time studying and classifying animals. Aside from valuing and respecting the inherent beauty and complexity found in every facet of nature, Aristotle also encouraged others to study and understand the natural world, a constant source of marvel, inspiration, and information all its own.


The roots of education … are bitter, but the fruit is sweet.

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The process of learning can be challenging, often demanding much of us and involving hard work and perseverance. But the rewards of education, as lifelong student Aristotle knew, are immensely valuable and gratifying. Like the reaping of a harvest after sowing, the long-term benefits and fulfillment that come from the effort and dedication put into education are well worth all the hard work.

Piety requires us to honor truth above our friends.

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Aristotle believed it was critically important to stay true to one's principles and moral values above all else. The concept of piety, often associated with religious duty, highlights the ethical responsibility to prioritize what is right and just over loyalty to our friends. Although Aristotle rejected traditional religion, here the word is used to emphasize the significance of maintaining one's moral compass even if it means disagreeing with our loved ones.

Our characters are the result of our conduct.

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A recurring idea in Aristotle’s work is the role of our habitual behaviors in defining our personal constitutions. It reflects a central theme of his ethical philosophy, which suggests that consistently practicing virtuous conduct leads to the development of virtuous character. It serves as a guiding principle throughout his exploration of ethics and the pursuit of a well-lived, righteous life.

Happiness then is the best, noblest, and most pleasant thing in the world.

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“Eudaimonia” is a central concept in Aristotle's ethical philosophy. Though it’s often translated to mean “happiness,” the concept encompasses a more enduring state of well-being than mere momentary pleasure. This profound type of human flourishing, he believed, was the result of living a life of upstanding actions and moral excellence — and he stated it to be the ultimate goal of human life.

One swallow does not make a summer, nor does one day; and so too one day, or a short time, does not make a man blessed and happy.

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Similar to his belief that our habits help define our character, Aristotle stressed the importance of consistency in achieving true happiness. Fleeting periods of joy or success don’t determine one's overall well-being; instead, lasting happiness results from sustained virtuous conduct and a life lived according to high moral standards.

Any one can get angry — that is easy … but to do this to the right person, to the right extent, at the right time, with the right motive, and in the right way, that is not for every one, nor is it easy.

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Aristotle understood the complexity — and the power — of anger. The often-volatile emotion wields the potential for both destructive and constructive change. To effectively harness its force, balance is crucial. Through the cultivation of mindfulness, compassion, and wisdom, we have the capacity to channel anger in a positively transformative manner.

A whole is that which has beginning, middle, and end.

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Aristotle’s Poetics is a seminal work of literary theory in which the philosopher discusses narrative structure, plot, the role of character development, the use of language and style, catharsis, and more. This quote reflects his idea that in order for something to be considered a complete and meaningful work, it should have a clear and coherent structure, with distinct phases — including a beginning, middle, and end. The insights in Poetics have had an enduring influence on literature, drama, and the arts.

Hope is the dream of a waking man.

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Aristotle prominently highlighted human aspirations and the pursuit of a fulfilling life. Here, he characterizes hope as a driving force,  underscoring its power as a motivating vision and a conscious dream to work toward in the waking world, rather than merely a chimerical wish or unspoken desire.

Much more practical are those mental activities and reflections which have their goal in themselves and take place for their own sake.

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Intellectual pursuits contain their own intrinsic values. Aristotle was highly motivated by the quest for knowledge and understanding, and these things alone, without external incentives, are inherently meaningful and purposeful. This quote also aligns with Aristotle’s belief that finding joy and well-being in life are goals that depend on ourselves and our own pursuit of happiness.

Featured image credit: Andrejs Marcenko/ Shutterstock

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About the Author
Nicole Villeneuve
Nicole is a writer, thrift store lover, and group-chat meme spammer based in Ontario, Canada.
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